riding horses and advice

By Retired breeder, 7th December 2016 19:56:32
82
post your problems and any advice that you may have for people

please don't get this one deleted like the last time
 
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Janastamenkovic wrote:

How do I breed a horse


In game?... Or IRL?
WhiteStagRanch
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Event Horizon wrote:

I should add that a pre-purchase exam is not a guarantee; it's a "snapshot" of what's going on with the horse on that day. That being said, a PPE can give you a good understanding of your risk. It can also possibly save you a lot of heartbreak and expense later.

As an example, I vetted a 7 yo warmblood cross doing 2'9 hunters on provincial circuit. Looked totally sound under-saddle, and had fairly good confirmation. Did a vet check - grade 3 heart murmur (on a scale of 5 I believe) and failed the flexion tests miserably. The money I spent on the PPE was well worth the money I saved in walking away from that horse.

One of the SmartPak vets said "a PPE isn't a crystal ball", but like I said it does give you a good understanding of the potential risks associated with any horse. And many horses have something "wrong" that will come up on a vet check; it's just a question of what is it, how it impacts them and how it impacts what you'd want to do for them. It's also a question of how much you can manage it.

I know that's a lot. But I see so many people getting a horse without a PPE and then finding out the horse has serious health or soundness issues that could have been easily flagged with a PPE.


YESS! I wish I had done a PPE on my newest mare, but since she was in a completely different state I had no idea how to even go about it. 5 y/o with raging IUFP and now possibly pre-cushingoid. She has been the most expensive animal I've owned from the start and as much as I love her sometimes I wish I had left her where she was default smiley (8)
GinOnJazz
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GinOnJazz wrote:

I love her sometimes I wish I had left her where she was

Oh I get that 100%. I love my mare to bits and wouldn't trade her for the world, but I look at the confirmation of her front legs sometimes and ask myself, "Girl, what in the world were you thinking??"
And maybe thats another good point for someone new to looking for horses - don't let your desperation to own a horse cloud your judgement. And at the same time, be reasonable.
Event Horizon
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Event Horizon wrote:

And maybe thats another good point for someone new to looking for horses - don't let your desperation to own a horse cloud your judgement. And at the same time, be reasonable.


For sure. Look at several before deciding. Don't buy the first one you look at without looking at others, and go with your gut. Also, make sure you show up earlier than scheduled to make sure the horse isn't drugged when testing it!
GinOnJazz
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Make sure when riding western to keep your core strong and your head, hip, and heels even and toes pointing down and out
horselover6
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So guys, I have an older (1994) Circle Y western show saddle I am trying to clean up and get ready for show season. Does anyone have products they swear by for cleaning up dingy silver plating? The silver on the saddle itself isn't that bad, but the bridles and breast collar are pretty rough. Any suggestions are appreciated!
GinOnJazz
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GinOnJazz wrote:

So guys, I have an older (1994) Circle Y western show saddle I am trying to clean up and get ready for show season. Does anyone have products they swear by for cleaning up dingy silver plating? The silver on the saddle itself isn't that bad, but the bridles and breast collar are pretty rough. Any suggestions are appreciated!


My dad uses wrights silver cleaner cream, like 5 bucks at Walmart. But he rides for pleasure, and only does local shows. It seems to work well.
Chips
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Nevr Dull is my favorite for cleaning any metal- brass, silver, steel, whatever. I use it on my nice halter's metal parts and when I was a working student it was literally all we ever used on clinchers and etc.
MistAndMagic
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How can I get my horse to bend around a circle? Just got my dressage test and lessons haven’t happened in a while (we moved barns) and I honestly haven’t done a circle lesson in a while. The good news is I have a couple months until the show, so I’ll be able to have tons of practice before the show default smiley :)
bananaboohoo
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bananaboohoo wrote:

How can I get my horse to bend around a circle? Just got my dressage test and lessons haven’t happened in a while (we moved barns) and I honestly haven’t done a circle lesson in a while. The good news is I have a couple months until the show, so I’ll be able to have tons of practice before the show default smiley :)


There are plenty of different riding styles in different disciplines, but for myself, I would try to break down the horse into different sections. I work on flexion of the neck, shoulder, ribcage, hips, etc. All of this is done on a circle, straight forward, diagonal, etc. I use pressure and release, so by placing pressure near the forehand, I'm asking my mare to move her shoulder away from my leg. By lifting the right rein, I'm asking her to bend her nose to the right.

To make it easier for myself, I'm always thinking about "walls" and "doors", My outside rein is a "wall" to support her neck, while my inside opens the "door". Same thing with my legs in a spin. To spin to the right, I create a wall with my left rein and left leg, while opening the door with my right rein and leg.

You can also find some great cone exercises on Pinterest!

It's kind of hard to explain through text, but I hope I helped!
WhiteStagRanch
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Does anyone know where I can find some workouts or methods to get myself back in shape for showing??
equestrian4life
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equestrian4life wrote:

Does anyone know where I can find some workouts or methods to get myself back in shape for showing??


Pinterest has some equestrian workouts, but you can also find plenty of workouts on YouTube! I follow Whitney Simmons and MadFit!
WhiteStagRanch
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bananaboohoo wrote:

How can I get my horse to bend around a circle? Just got my dressage test and lessons haven’t happened in a while (we moved barns) and I honestly haven’t done a circle lesson in a while. The good news is I have a couple months until the show, so I’ll be able to have tons of practice before the show default smiley :)

Seconding what WhiteStagRanch said, but another perspective (since you can never have too many!)
Imagine using your leg and rein aids to create a tunnel, which your horse must fit through. Use your inside aids (especially your leg) to create the bend, and your outside aids to "catch" the horse as it moves away from the pressure of your inside aids. Your inside rein will be slightly opening, and your outside rein will be slightly forward to allow the correct bend. For a 20 meter circle, the opening of the inside rein and the allowing of the outside rein will be very subtle (maybe half an inch difference from your normal position), but they should still be present.
Riding with good ring geometry will also encourage the correct bend on the circle, so make sure you know your landmarks in the dressage ring!
EmeraldHillsFarm
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equestrian4life wrote:

Does anyone know where I can find some workouts or methods to get myself back in shape for showing??

Pilates is pretty universally acclaimed as a fitness program for riders, and there are TONS of resources online for that as well as in person classes (if that's possible in your area due to covid). I also recommend getting some books by Daniel Stewart, who specializes in rider fitness and sport psychology. He's really good at creating exercises tailored for riders that don't require much space or equipment.
EmeraldHillsFarm
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Hey I know I'm not necessarily asking for advice, but I figured it's topic related.
My 4 going on 5 year old mustang gelding, Atlas, got sent of to the trainers to get started. This was on Saturday and by Tuesday he had his first ride. He's doing so good!
(Feel free to ask any questions or give your opinion about it, I am open to discussion)
rccooke03
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rccooke03 wrote:

Hey I know I'm not necessarily asking for advice, but I figured it's topic related.
My 4 going on 5 year old mustang gelding, Atlas, got sent of to the trainers to get started. This was on Saturday and by Tuesday he had his first ride. He's doing so good!
(Feel free to ask any questions or give your opinion about it, I am open to discussion)


Hey that's awesome! Glad to hear he's doing well. default smiley :)
I've never sent a horse for training, but I imagine its a bit nerve-wracking. It requires a lot of trust in the trainer and their program.
Event Horizon
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Oooh EmeraldHillsFarm I love the tunnel analogy!!

rccooke03 I love mustangs! What HMA is your boy from?
WhiteStagRanch
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I just started riding again and I forgot everything I learned default smiley xd Does anybody have any tips on how to keep my feet in the stirrups when doing rising trot or canter since my feet seem to always slip?
lexie.0623
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lexie.0623 wrote:

I just started riding again and I forgot everything I learned default smiley xd Does anybody have any tips on how to keep my feet in the stirrups when doing rising trot or canter since my feet seem to always slip?


For me, if I focus on contact through my entire leg (especially my knees) and really press my heels down, my feet don't slip out. Also, focusing on weight in your SEAT and not your FEET will help, too! Rely more on the balance of your seat instead of focusing on putting all your weight in your feet.

Also, post the rising trot without stirrups! That helps teach you to use your seat and knees to post instead of relying on stirrups. To develop those muscles more, you can also "post" at the walk. It feels awkward, but it's great for learning to post correctly.

To focus more on what you are doing, sometimes it's helpful to have someone lunge the horse while you're riding. It relieves you of some of the different things you have to focus on, like direction, collection, etc.
WhiteStagRanch
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WhiteStagRanch wrote:

Also, post the rising trot without stirrups! That helps teach you to use your seat and knees to post instead of relying on stirrups.

If you're doing no-stirrups, make sure you're being supervised by an instructor. It's good for your muscles, but it can get you into the habit of pinching with your knees if you're not careful- ideally, you want to be posting off your thighs.
MistAndMagic
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lexie.0623 wrote:

I just started riding again and I forgot everything I learned default smiley xd Does anybody have any tips on how to keep my feet in the stirrups when doing rising trot or canter since my feet seem to always slip?

A couple of visualization techniques I've used:
1) There are weights attached to the bottom of your feet, and simultaneously a string attached to your head pulling you up to your sky. This will keep your weight going down your whole leg into your heels, but also makes sure you sit up and keep good posture in your neck and back.
2) You are pushing your weight down through your thighs. (This is particularly helpful in a jumping or general purpose english saddle). I find that focusing on pushing through my thighs keeps the whole leg engaged and my weight down, without pinching at the knees. Like WhiteStagRanch said, you need to engage your whole leg, otherwise the strongest point of grip (typically the calf or the knee) becomes a pivot point, which you absolutely don't want.

Of course, your trainer should have exercises that will help you as well, including the best exercise of all-- time and practice!
EmeraldHillsFarm
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equestrian4life wrote:

Does anyone know where I can find some workouts or methods to get myself back in shape for showing??


As an Equitation and horsemanship rider. Legs and abs for days. I spend a lot of time on legs because I hate abs with a passion but it is a absolute must. Honestly, find a work out that focuses much more on legs and abs but that you enjoy. I have friends who love cardio and spend most their work out on the treadmill or biking to build legs. Personally I hate cardio, so I do about 15 minutes usually running though I got in a horse wreck and have a bruised femur so right now I use an eliptical and then I weight lift which is great if you have access to a gym and know how to weight lift properly. Which has really helped my leg strength. The big thing is being in shape to help your seat and strength. I think you can do this many ways just depends on body type and what you enjoy. If you hate the work out chances are you wont stick with it. I stick with what I enjoy and focus more on core and legs since thats what helps me as a rider more so them arms. I have a friend who swears by yogo for core work outs and that it helps her as a rider a lot. Just find what you enjoy so you want to stick with it.
TwinPeakStables
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I'm starting to take jumping lessons and I was wandering if you had any advice.
Georgia 12
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I am not a jumper but just general seat... Definitely have confidence. (Fake it till you make it lol) this will help you keep your balance especially over jumps and keep you calm. It will allow better communication between you and your horse. Overall keeping you in the saddle. Just a tip!
rccooke03
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Georgia 12 wrote:

I'm starting to take jumping lessons and I was wandering if you had any advice.

Eyes up, eyes up, eyes up. You'll want to look down and watch the jump most likely, but if you look at the ground, that's where you'll end up. Look before you think you need to when turning to the jump or going to the next jump.
MistAndMagic
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