riding horses and advice

By Retired breeder, 7th December 2016 19:56:32
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post your problems and any advice that you may have for people

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We usually warm up at the walk/trot for a good 20 minutes just doing serpentines and spirals and circles while encouraging him to stretch down and soften his topline, as well as doing some stretchy canter circles before I actually start asking him to get on the bit and collect himself, or before we do any jumping. He's been incredibly fussy about contact lately too and I have a sneaking suspicion he needs his teeth floated (he has one missing one so could just be the opposite tooth being slightly too long and bugging him), so when I get the vet out for that, I'll have them do a physical exam and workup as well. It's not me, he has a hard time on the lunge as well to the right and tends to either switch direction if we're free lunging, or lean on me for support if I have him on a line.
MistAndMagic
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@MistandMagic

If the vet doesn't find anything, I'd consider a massage therapist! They can do a full body massage and in my area at least it's fairly reasonable in price. Good ones can give you instructions for massages and stretches that you can do by yourself to release the areas that your horse tends to hold tension in.
EmeraldHillsFarm
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Dose anyone have advice to touch a horse that has never been touched?
We have on at my farm but I can touch it and I really want to start working with her default smiley :s
RemStar419
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RemStar419 wrote:

Dose anyone have advice to touch a horse that has never been touched?
We have on at my farm but I can touch it and I really want to start working with her default smiley :s
'
I'm not an expert, but,
1. Don't touch nose, mouth, head, flanks, sensitive areas.

If the horse isn't afraid of whips, take a lunge whip and drag it on her/his legs, not hurting the horse though. this will teach the horse you won't hurt him/her, and keep you a safe distance so you won't get kicked.default smiley :) When the horse gets used to you, maybe try dragging the whip over the back. (Still not hurting the horse)
Mustangluver
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RemStar419 wrote:

Dose anyone have advice to touch a horse that has never been touched?
We have on at my farm but I can touch it and I really want to start working with her default smiley :s


If she’s never been touched, it will take a while for her to trust you. Don’t expect to be stroking her in a day!
The first thing you need to do is make sure she gets used to, and appreciates, your presence. Be around her as often as you can, talk to her, offer her treats (but don’t actually hand them to her yet) and food. This will most likely take a while, but is essential in the process.
Do everything slowly, but confidently. If you take things to fast, you’ll just end up frightening her.

When she finally accepts you, you can start going over to her. You should keep talking lowly and reassuring her. I like the idea about using a whip, but you need to make sure you’re not tickling her, just getting her used to be touched by something foreign. A lunge whip is probably not the best choice as its quite flimsy and ‘tickly’ rather than sturdy. Every day get closer until you can stand next to her. Then you can try calmly and gently touching her. Stay away from the face, stomach, quarters and legs. Make sure she can see you, I’d personally go for the shoulders and stand where it’s easy for her to look.

I recommend having someone nearby, just incase things get a bit haphazard and something happens (:
roses_are_rosie
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RemStar419 wrote:

Dose anyone have advice to touch a horse that has never been touched?
We have on at my farm but I can touch it and I really want to start working with her default smiley :s

Get a trainer. Online people can only help you so much, especially if you're working with a horse that hasn't even been halter broken. It's hard to do right and easy to mess up.
MistAndMagic
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RemStar419 wrote:

Dose anyone have advice to touch a horse that has never been touched?
We have on at my farm but I can touch it and I really want to start working with her default smiley :s


I'm not an expert, and most (if not all!) of us on Howrse aren't professionals. I suggest you contact the owner of the horse and ask him/her to help you along with an equine professional.
bananaboohoo
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RemStar419 wrote:

Dose anyone have advice to touch a horse that has never been touched?
We have on at my farm but I can touch it and I really want to start working with her default smiley :s

I'll reiterate what others have said, and say once again to get a trainer. You absolutely need someone with lots of experiencing working with untouched (essentially feral) horses. You don't want to put yourself, others, or the horse in danger, which you could very easily do going in there on your own.
You said this horse lives on your farm, are you/a member of your family the owner? Who is primarily responsible for this horse's care, and has left it with practically no human contact?
EmeraldHillsFarm
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Update: I think he may have just tweaked something in the pasture that took a little while to heal because while he's still being fussy about contact, he was nice and bendy to the right again today, and even gave me some lovely leg yields at the trot and canter. So weird! I'm glad he's moving better though.
MistAndMagic
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I haven’t ridden in about two months due to the virus, and last week I finally started back again. I am on a more advanced horse now with a huge canter stride, but the horse I was on is retired now so I am stuck with Honey Pot, which isn’t a bad thing! But... her canter stride is so big. Last week, I improved greatly on stopping her in the canter and even improved my sitting canter on her a bit. I still lack confidence in her canter though. It’s mostly because it’s so big, it’s hard to sit. I trust her, just not her canter stride. Any tips to sit it?
HannahNotFound
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HannahNotFound wrote:

I haven’t ridden in about two months due to the virus, and last week I finally started back again. I am on a more advanced horse now with a huge canter stride, but the horse I was on is retired now so I am stuck with Honey Pot, which isn’t a bad thing! But... her canter stride is so big. Last week, I improved greatly on stopping her in the canter and even improved my sitting canter on her a bit. I still lack confidence in her canter though. It’s mostly because it’s so big, it’s hard to sit. I trust her, just not her canter stride. Any tips to sit it?

This is going to sound a bit counterintuitive, but- riding it in two point until you get used to it can help you feel more secure, and so it becomes easier to relax into it and eventually sit softly and go with her. Also: think about dusting the saddle with your rear instead of bouncing up and down. That helped a lot for me, as well as strengthening exercises like squats and crunches, because it's hard to sit nicely when you're getting more thrown around than you're used to.
MistAndMagic
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HannahNotFound wrote:

I haven’t ridden in about two months due to the virus, and last week I finally started back again. I am on a more advanced horse now with a huge canter stride, but the horse I was on is retired now so I am stuck with Honey Pot, which isn’t a bad thing! But... her canter stride is so big. Last week, I improved greatly on stopping her in the canter and even improved my sitting canter on her a bit. I still lack confidence in her canter though. It’s mostly because it’s so big, it’s hard to sit. I trust her, just not her canter stride. Any tips to sit it?

Practice practice practice! The more you work on it, the better you'll get as you become stronger and more coordinated. You'll need to allow your hips to move back and forth ("dusting the saddle" like MistAndMagic said above") while your thighs and core remain engaged. You can experiment with whether it is easier to get used to it sitting or half seating. Your instructor will likely insist that you ride in one or the other. And of course, your trainer will be able to offer you more personalized advice than any of us, as they are the one's watching you ride!
EmeraldHillsFarm
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HannahNotFound wrote:

I haven’t ridden in about two months due to the virus, and last week I finally started back again. I am on a more advanced horse now with a huge canter stride, but the horse I was on is retired now so I am stuck with Honey Pot, which isn’t a bad thing! But... her canter stride is so big. Last week, I improved greatly on stopping her in the canter and even improved my sitting canter on her a bit. I still lack confidence in her canter though. It’s mostly because it’s so big, it’s hard to sit. I trust her, just not her canter stride. Any tips to sit it?

Try half seating. Basically a two point kind of, it will help you not feel so bouncy.
0horsegirl
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P.R.E. girl wrote:

Hey! I'm a dressage rider and I've just started with a New coach and entered the barn Team so I can compete. I get nervous easily so I was wondering if you have any anti-showstress advice?


Just remember to take deep breaths and try your best. default smiley :)
0horsegirl
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I'm trying to compete in Barrel Racing (like you know a rodeo) but I can't until Corona-virus is gone and I can't until next year. Any advice on how to practice?default smiley :s
friesian576
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The horse that I ride is Half Mustang-Half Arabian and his strides are so fast. I feel fully confident but I am terrified of running into the fences and it is very hard to control Tex (the horse) to turn when I want him to. And he can sense my fear and takes off faster and faster until I enjoy it. I don't know why. any advice?
friesian576
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friesian576 wrote:

The horse that I ride is Half Mustang-Half Arabian and his strides are so fast. I feel fully confident but I am terrified of running into the fences and it is very hard to control Tex (the horse) to turn when I want him to. And he can sense my fear and takes off faster and faster until I enjoy it. I don't know why. any advice?


It sounds like your horse doesn't understand what your aids mean. I'm not sure whether you own this horse or not, but you should really talk to a trainer.
Event Horizon
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@friesan576

Work on your brakes with this horse at slower gaits first before you do any work at speed. If you can't get the aids to go through when the horse is in a low intensity situation, then they'll never go through in a high intensity one! I would also recommend that you work with a trainer who can give you more personalized advice. You sound like you're just starting out, and its a good idea to get a strong foundation with the help of a professional at this stage of your riding.
EmeraldHillsFarm
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friesian576 wrote:

I'm trying to compete in Barrel Racing (like you know a rodeo) but I can't until Corona-virus is gone and I can't until next year. Any advice on how to practice?default smiley :s

Do you have a lot of experience? I’m no expert on barrel racing (a show jumper myself) but I would just keep practicing the barrel pattern, start slow, then add speed as you and your horse become more comfortable : hope this helps
0horsegirl
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friesian576 wrote:

I'm trying to compete in Barrel Racing (like you know a rodeo) but I can't until Corona-virus is gone and I can't until next year. Any advice on how to practice?default smiley :s


Barrel racer here. Do you have access to an arena, and cones or plastic barrels?

If you don't have barrels, you can get cheap cones from the hardware store and use those in place of barrels.

During the off-season, I don't practice the pattern as much but when starting a horse on the barrel pattern I always start off in a snaffle. I don't bit up for "control". You want them soft and responsive in anything you use on them.

I always extended-trot the pattern first. When I'm doing that, I'll go around the first barrel, stop, back up, wait, finish the rest of the pattern, and "switch things up" during the pattern to keep your horse from blowing through the pattern without second thought and to keep control. When they can smoothly go through the pattern at an extended-trot, then I lope it. Do run throughs of the pattern without "drills", then some drills, then end it with another run through.

My horse, once I got her consistent on the pattern, didn't need to practice it that often tbh. I also don't like overdoing it and practicing it too often, because I find that makes them too antsy and overkill.
theclevercremello
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@HailyBean, I had the same issue with my gelding. He was absolutely perfect when he wasn't asked to stop. I ended up using a halter with reins attached as well as a neck rope. You can use a bridle but if you ride in one regularly and the horse stops fine, use a halter. This way your horse can learn how to ride bitless first, and you can give your horse treats more easily. And treats are VERY important! I got my horse to stop on a dime after a week when I used treats, the previous week I didn't use treats and he wouldn't stop.

So, first after you have gotten on, walk around in the halter with reins and neckrope. Do some leg yielding, serpentines, circles, stretching, relaxation, collection and extension, whatever you usually do to warm up. Do this and reward your horse with a treat after each one she does particularly well or if its new to her. Then, ask for a random woah from a walk somewhere, if she does it right away or takes another step or two reward her a lot! Give her a small handful of cookies! If she takes more than a few steps just from a walk still praise her but don't waste all your cookies. if she ignores you, turn her in a small circle or back her up. Repeat this step until she stops really well at the walk. Then you can start trotting and cantering. Repeat these steps at the trot and canter. When she is stopping very well you can try bridleless again, but be very careful because if she didn't stop that could end in disaster.

Also, I would love to pass on the amazing, geniusness that is the YouTube channel Harmony Horsemanship! Please check her out, she has lots of helpful training tips and she videos herself working with horses. It's really interesting and she does a lot of bridleless too.

Anyways, hope this helps. I am by no means professional but I have been riding and training for 10 years and feel I can help you on this. Thank you for taking the time to read this. Good luck!
Hamilfan
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@RemStar419, I think you should check out Harmony Horsemanship on YouTube. She does lots of mustangs.
Hamilfan
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[quote=1936888831][author]friesian576[/author]I'm trying to compete in Barrel Racing (like you know a rodeo) but I can't until Corona-virus is gone and I can't until next year. Any advice on how to practice?default smiley :s[/quote:0] Hi. I (try) to practice barrels all the time. What my family does is we have barrels and wee filled them with rocks. Then whenever we want to practice, we just roll the barrels into the correct position! I hope this helps! default smiley ;)
ForestnJesus
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Thats good and all but please use outdoors. Please �
olivia23
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I ride a crazy OTTB. She’s got a really fast canter. I two-point to get off her back because it helps me balance. I get pretty scared in her canter because she gets so fast. However, I can calm myself down so I take deep breaths which slows her down. But she will eventually canter faster even after I get her to slow down! Any tips are appreciated. Thanks!
bananaboohoo
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